1-888-384-2669
514-344-8888

TWO TERRIFIC CHIANTI WINES

177516899

Chianti is one of the central regions in Tuscany. Chianti wines, formerly recognized by the squat bottles encased in a straw basket has now joined the rest of the region as one of the major producers of elegant water for the gods.

The Chianti recipe as we know it today, was created by Baron Bettino Ricasole. Taking a run down family property, he began analyzing grapes from various vines and discovered that each type of fruit resulted in a specialized palate. Today, all wines labelled as Chianti comprise 70% Sangiovese, 15% Canaiolo, and 15% Malivasia Bianca. However, in 1992 white grapes were prohibited from use in a Chianti Classico. There are tens of thousands of small vineyards producing Chianti and the best way to find a good wine, is by tasting. Of course, Ricasole remains the larges producer but don’t limit yourself with some many other wines on the market. New organic wines are taking space on the shelves. My two faves (at the moment) from Chianti:

AMA 2010.  Priced at about $27 Canadian and $17 Euros in Greve, this wine has flavourful bouquet that opens beautifully from the first sip. Here is a wine that can be enjoyed in its youth without breaking the bank. Founded in 1972, Castello di Ama provides a great product, thanks to dedication and hard work of founders Marco Pallanti and Lorenza Sebasti.

SAN LORENZO MARKET

In mid April of this year, 2014, the San Lorenzo market opened its newly renovated space. Better than “Eataly,” this is Eat IN Italy. Wine tasting, pasta tasting, cheese tasting, pizza tasting, and mama mia! This experience will make both “foodies” and “give me the food” people very happy.

After filling your belly with some local specialties, walk outside around on the streets that form a perimeter. Change your gears from food to clothing and souvenirs. Wander through the leather stalls. Besides being the largest market in Florence, you will also find some of the best bargains for shoes and purses. If interested, you’ll also find cheap and tacky souvenirs at good prices – from T-shirts to key chains, from wine bottle openers to bookmarks. Though this market is not known for bartering, the prices and variety still make it a treat. Avoid buying the knock offs sold on the streets.DSC_0895

The San Lorenzo Market is open daily and caters to locals as well as tourists. Mornings are the best time to visit while casalingue A.K.A. housewives are doing their regular food shopping. It is still common practice to buy food daily and eat it fresh.

 

COOKING AND CULTURE – FLORENCE AND TUSCAN HILL TOWNS

matlagningskurs_italien

Capture the essence and flavors of Tuscany on our iconic cooking and culture trip. Visit Florence and the Tuscan Hills. Feast your eyes on picturesque rolling hills, charming renaissance gardens, medieval towns, and hill-hugging vineyards. Whether it’s your first time, or if you’ve been there before, let the magic of Tuscany memorize you.

Highlights

  • Florence Cooking and Cooking will awaken your senses.
  • Tuscan wine tour and tasting.
  • Heritage architectureal  walking tour of Florence.
  • Tour of Siena including Piazza del Campo and Palazzo Pubblico.
  • Sleep in the noble house of a Renaissance Villa, surrounded by heritage protected vineyards.
  • Cooking with our Master Chef, making authentic regional foods using updated versions of centuries-old Tuscan family recipes.
  • Go deep into the heart of the Tuscan countryside.
  • Sip wine fat our carefully selected vineyards.
  • Meander the cobbled streets in Medieval Siena a and Renaissance Florence with our expert local guide.
  • Visit authentic food markets and learn about local produce.
  • Eat, drink, walk and be immersed in Tuscan culture. Enjoy!

LET’S TALK

Wine tasting etiquette

wine-tasting-etiquette

Wine tasting etiquette. To spit or not to spit?

On a recent walking holiday in Sicily I took a group to the Etna vineyards for a wine tasting adventure. Lava rich soil nourishes the grapes yielding a distinctive – and strong – flavour. Our group of mixed neophyte tasters and experienced oenophiles wanted to know, “Do we spit the wine after tasting or swallow it?”